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Until the Day Breaks and the Shadows Flee

Until the day breaks and the shadows flee, turn, my beloved, and be like a gazelle or like a young stag on the rugged hills.Song of Solomon, 2:17

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For 113 years now, San Pascual Baylon Han Guinarona, has been doing miracles in our parish. For all those years, never has been an acknowledgment by the world at large that the Guinarona San Pascual Baylon Parish Church in Leyte, Philippines, has been a magnet for pilgrims from near and far, and it is time for rectification. Through those years, too, we have lost people actively involved in promoting the parish for pilgrimage tourism.

Of late, with the major donations by the The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and the others, there has been an outstanding refurbishment of our church. Of major significance, too, is that we have had the bone relic of San Pascual Baylon since May 2012. Too, we now have a new life-size image of our dear patron saint.

In the way of water seeking its own level, it is now time to up the ante, namely, that we push for a National Shrine status.

Procedure

For a church to receive the status of a national shrine involves a number of steps and certifications. It must first be a diocesan (or archdiocesan) shrine, an honor conferred by the local bishop or archbishop.[2] To become a diocesan shrine, the subject church must be a place “to which numerous members of the faithful make pilgrimage for a special reason of piety”[3] and exceed other churches in terms of worship, Christian formation and social services.[2] When these requirements are met, the parish petitions the bishop to canonically elevate the church.[2]
When devotion has grown, the diocesan shrine may petition the national Conference of Catholic Bishops. Evaluation by the nation’s bishops involves considerations including canon law, liturgy, and doctrine Wikipedia

To declare a parish church a National Shrine is indeed a great honor, but the process entails several steps and requirements. First, it has to be already a Diocesan Shrine (or Archdiocesan Shrine), it is reserved to the Bishop of the diocese to pronounce a parish as a Diocesan or Archdiocesan Shrine. It is reserved to the Bishop of the diocese to pronounce a parish a Diocesan Shrine. The Parish Church must be above other churches when it comes to worship, Christian formation and Social Services. When all these demands are met, the Priests together with the Parish Council, Parishioners and frequent church-goers should petition the Bishop to canonically elevate the church into a Diocesan Shrine.

After several years, when devotion has grown deemed and it is possible, the faithful involved in the Shrine may apply for its elevation to National level to the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP). Msgr. Jose stated how intense the inquiry would be before declaring a church National Shrine. He said, as in their case, its application will pass through a lengthy investigation by three Commissions of CBCP; namely the Commission on Canon Law, where the application will pass through a legal consultation, the Commission on Liturgy, which will scrutinize the frequency of the shrine in rendering liturgical services, and lastly, the Commission on Doctrine, to ensure the conformity of the shrine’s devotional practices to the teachings of the Universal Church.

The National Shrine of our Lady of Guadalupe was declared a Archdiocesan Shrine by the late Jaime Cardinal Sin on August 15, 2002. On April 5, 2004, the petition to elevate the shrine into National Level was made to Bishop Fernando Capalla of Davao, then CBCP President. Bishop Leonardo Medroso, head of the Episcopal Commission on Canon Law assigned Msgr. Romulo Vergara to head the investigative committee. On January 23, 2010 the CBCP approved the petition. The following month, February 5, 2010, the decree of establishment of the National Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe was signed by the CBCP President Bishop Nereo P. Odchimar.

Upon the elevation of the Shrine, challenges await the shrine’s administration. Msgr. Jose said that the primary thing to face is to enable the Shrine to be a church that welcomes and cater to pilgrims in particular with life issues from womb to tomb. “Mary is the Mother of Jesus, of Christians; she is a type and model of the Church” said Msgr. Jose. “In the womb of the Mother Church, all are taken care of” he added. Fr. Erick however pointed on the adjustments he is about to take, adjustment from a small parish to not only a large parish but to a National Shrine. “Attracting more and more pilgrims devotees, not only in the archdiocese from other dioceses is the bigger challenge I would have to take.”

Amidst the complexity administering a shrine, Fr. Erick, by God’s grace, is ready to face what lies ahead in order to promote the devotion to our Lady especially pro-life advocacies. – The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Manila

We call on our people to work for this realization.

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Scarborough Shoal: Close Encounters with China

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Scarborough Shoal: Close Encounters with China. Written by Bam Alegre for SubSelfie.com.

Technically, the place is merely a collection of rocks and reefs. But its numerous names mirror the tension that has engulfed its waters. China believes it is Huangyan Dao based on their historical claims. Filipino fishermen from Zambales refer to it as Kalburo or Bajo de Masinloc or Panatag Shoal — a safe haven against storms.

But for the rest of the world, it is Scarborough Shoal, the focus of a territorial dispute between the Philippines and China.

Photo courtesy: Ateneo de Manila University. “This map, published in 1710 by Heinrich Scherer, shows Hainan island as the southernmost territory of China. This map also shows the unnamed Spratlys as part of the Philippines.” Photo courtesy: Ateneo de Manila University.

Last July 12, 2016, the United Nations Arbitration Tribunal denied the legal basis of China’s historic claiming rights in the area. The ruling also declared that China violated the sovereign rights of the Philippines by interfering with Filipino fishermen, failing…

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Sorcery in Governance

In one of the comments in the Daily Inquirer, one posited, albeit with levity, that a sorcerer-consultant is dictating Duterte to kill as many as he can, so that he can can be macho forever. I find this plausible, considering that in his campaign sorties, Duterte would mete out towels with his lint to his fans–and how they go crazy! A definite sign of sorcery.

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Sorcery 101

Perhaps, he gave a lint-filled towel to Senator Alan Cayetano, for him to sniff every now and then. Guess how Cayetano behaves these days–a bewitched son of a gun.

Marcos, whom Duterte adores, was also into sorcery or that he had a sorcerer consultant. Or do you remember his being gaga over the number 7?

Sorcery has been in world government since the onset of civilization. In Mexico, the Aztecs butchered men and women as sacrifice to their gods. In Russia, one notes that Rasputin, the sorcerer, held sway to the Tsar and Tsarina in 1901 onward.

Supporters deifying Duterte

Supporters deifying Duterte

In contemporary times, we have the Rosicrucian holding sway in government. Ditto the Masonic Lodge, where most government officials are members.

In Africa, we have this account by Harry West:

“On the Mueda Plateau,Mozambique, it is said that sorcerers feed on the well-being of their rivals, neighbors, and/or kin. By rendering themselves invisible, they transcend the world inhabited by ordinary people, producing and inhabiting an invisible realm from which they gain powerful perspective on the visible—a platform from which to elaborate and bring to fruition ghastly visions of carnage that feed their insatiable appetites. These acts, however, do not go unchallenged. Responsible figures of authority, including healers, lineage councilors, settlement heads, and even contemporary village presidents, are also said to be capable of entering into the invisible realm of sorcery. Acting as “sorcerers of construction,” they transcend not only the world inhabited by ordinary Muedans but also that of “sorcerers of ruin,” fixing the latter in their gaze, monitoring and controlling sorcerers’ activities, unmaking sorcerers’ acts, and remaking the world in accordance with their own visions of a world reordered. . .and so the game of one-upmanship, comprising transcendent maneuvers that Muedans gloss with the verb kupilikulu (to invert, reverse, to overturn, to negate, to annul, to undo), continues in perpetuity.”

Granted that Duterte’s sorcerer commands him to kill millions as sacrifice, this is anathema to the norms of the civilized world, hence the friction with the European Union, the United Nations and the United States, from which the Philippines depends much in terms of trade and defense.

The question now is: Who will blink?

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Summary Execution at Temple Drive

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Summary Execution at Temple Drive. Written by Bam Alegre for SubSelfie.com.

On September 10, 2016, at around 1:55am, witnesses said they saw a silver Toyota Fortuner come to a complete stop in a sidewalk along Temple Drive in Barangay Ugong Norte, Quezon City. Afterwards, they heard multiple gunshots. Then the vehicle sped away in the direction of White Plains Subdivision.

In a matter of split seconds, they saw the lifeless body of a woman by the road with blood stains near her chest. The policemen who immediately responded in the area found an ID card near the corpse — she was Aurora Ma. F. Moynihan, 45 years old.

Most headlines focused on the fact that she is the sister of actress Maritoni Fernandez. But what’s bothering is that it was yet again another cold blooded murder done under cover of night. The suspects left a cardboard with a cryptic message — DRUG PUSHER ng mga Celebrities KASUNOD na KAYO! (Drug pushers of celebrities…

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Important Message from Keeper of Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe. – Chief Arvol Looking Horse

Make No Bones About It

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I, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, of the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota Nations, ask you to understand an Indigenous perspective on what has happened in America, what we call “Turtle Island.” My words seek to unite the global community through a message from our sacred ceremonies to unite spiritually, each in our own ways of beliefs in the Creator.

We have been warned from ancient prophecies of these times we live in today, but have also been given a very important message about a solution to turn these terrible times.

To understand the depth of this message you must recognize the importance of Sacred Sites and realize the interconnectedness of what is happening today, in reflection of the continued massacres that are occurring on other lands and our own Americas.

I have been learning about these important issues since the age of 12 when I received the Sacred White Buffalo Calf…

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The Davao of My Youth

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Talomo Beach, Davao City, PH

 

DUTERTE, THE COPYCAT

Just like today, during Marcos’s Martial Law, there was this effing LIST of people to be hunted down for arrest/liquidation, and I was on that list.

I was a campus journalist, and that was my extra-curricular activity, while the others went the fraternity route, and some such organization. The Philippine Constabulary raided our office and Ulysses Yu, our typist, took the brunt. He was manhandled, tortured, and taken to Cebu for detention. He was made to eat banana peels and Colgate, as they were trying to extract “information.” Which was bullshit because we were not NPA’s; journalism was our livelihood; it helped us defray our school expenses. All students were assessed monthly fees for our paper, and we were paid for putting it out.

Because of the heartache, Ulysses’s father died while he was kept incommunicado. During the funeral, Ulysses was there, handcuffed and with bodyguards.

I was warned of my impending arrest and the chief of police advised me to go elsewhere to cool it.

Which explains my Davao sojourn.

Back in 1972, I spent a lot of time in Davao City to escape Marcos’s Martial Law. When I worked in the Consunji Group of Companies in 1979, my turf was Davao City also, inasmuch as the Consunjis have extensive industrial operations there.

My cousins and I would cavort and swim in Talomo Beach, where my uncle, Pablo Remalante, had properties, including a fleet of passenger jeeps plying the Talomo-Bangekerohan route. So I was free to ride to downtown and back, to visit other relatives as well as to scout for work. One time I worked in construction, digging the foundations of houses being built, and it was difficult as hell. I worked with no shirt on and I would suffer sunburns all over.

I never heard of Duterte then. Davao was under a different leader. But then, I did not concern myself with local politics. I just wanted to be safe from the Marcos’s Death Squad (yes, the dreaded police).

I liked the fresh fish of the Talomo fishermen, which was excellent for sinigang (fish broth) and for kinilaw (fish salad). The Dumoy water was tops; it was sweet to the taste. They said it came from Mount Apo.

At the back of uncle’s house were nipa groves, and we would laze it out there, watching the big lizards crawl in and out of their holes.

Other times we would commute to Tugbok to just kill time with our other friends. We would have cook outs and have our fill till our stomachs explode with bugrit (diarrhea). We would also go to Kalinan, a mountainous area but bereft of trees—even the rivers have scant water. The GSIS Village is near Talomo, so we would also hang out there.

When I worked with the Consunjis, I commuted to Davao and stayed at Ecoland. I would have my fill of fresh Jersey milk, which the Group produced—but then the milk was very fatty and I would visit the bathroom more than usual, with the dreaded bugrit, what else.

So don’t say I don’t love Davao. It was once a part of my life.